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 Some blood pressure meds found protective against dementia 
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Joined: Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:43 pm
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Post Some blood pressure meds found protective against dementia
I found the article (link below) on classes of blood pressure meds and their association with dementia:

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2009-07/wfub-sbp072009.php


Excerpts:
Quote:
Some ACE inhibitors are known as "centrally-acting" because they can cross the blood-brain barrier, a specialized system of tiny blood vessels that protects the brain from harmful substances in the blood stream. Centrally-acting ACE inhibitors include captropril (Capoten®), fosinopril (Monopril®), lisinopril (Prinivil® or Zestri®), perindopril (Aceon®), ramipril (Altace®) and trandolapril (Mavik®).



Quote:
The study found an association between taking centrally-active ACE inhibitors and lower rates of mental decline as measured by the Modified Mini-Mental State Exam, a test that evaluates memory, language, abstract reasoning and other cognitive functions. The research showed that participants who were exposed to ACE inhibitors that cross the blood-brain barrier saw an average 65 percent less cognitive decline per year of exposure compared to participants taking other blood pressure medications.

Researchers also found that non-centrally active ACE inhibitors were associated with an increased risk of dementia and the people taking them were more likely to develop difficulty performing daily activities. Specifically, participants who, for three years, took ACE inhibitors that do not cross the blood-brain barrier were at a 73 percent greater risk of developing dementia than were the individuals taking other anti-hypertensive drugs.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:25 am
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Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 11:23 am
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I saw that article about ACE inhibitors.
When we get home from Florida I think I will ask his MD to switch him from Doxazosin to Prinivil. Or add a small amt of Prinivel to his schedule. He has been on the Doxazosin for about three years and the dose has gone from 1mg to 8mg but the BP still is about 150/87. When he was in the hospital he was given Prinivel for a spike in BP.
The reason he was put on Doxazosin in the first place was his enlarged prostate. The combination Doxazosin and Fenesteride seems to be working for that. Recently (while we are away from home) his BP spiked so I quarted one of my Prinivil and gave him and it brought his BP down to normal. When he was having the initial workup for LBD, the MRI showed multiple small strokes. I was told it was not uncommon to have small strokes. Especially at his age of 72. It makes me wonder if all of this came on (or appeared to come on) so suddenly, maybe strokes could have precipitated it.
Mary
Mary


Tue Dec 29, 2009 10:29 am
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Joined: Sun Dec 20, 2009 7:43 pm
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I think your small stroke theory could definitely be a factor - my mom's scans showed them also and she had high blood pressure starting in early middle age. Dementias can definitely be multifactorial.

My mother's first real symptom was a sudden inability to walk while gardening in the side yard. Scans showed some small strokes. That was the beginning for her.

My mother's mother had Alzhimer's and my mother doesn't seem to have that, but she could have some brain tangles here and there as well. Her symptoms are so much different from her mother's. She has preserved her vocabulary and recognizes everyone. My grandmother had more mobility... she could walk but in the late stages but only when someone would sing 'Onward Christain Soldiers'. There is no inspirational hymn that would allow my mother to walk unaided.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 10:34 am
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:46 pm
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Location: SF Bay Area (Northern CA)
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Here's a link to a beta blocker study in 2007:
http://community.lbda.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=427

The three CNS active beta-blockers mentioned in that study (as potentially the medication causing lower MMSE scores and delayed recall scores) were propranolol, metoprolol, and carvedilol.

So, in the beta blocker study, it was deemed bad to take CNS active drugs but in the present study taking something CNS active was found to be good.


Scientist - sorry to read that you've got some kind of dementia perhaps running in your family. Was your grandmother's diagnosis autopsy-confirmed by chance? Of course you don't have to have parkinsonism to have LBD.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 11:02 am
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Hi Robin,

Yes the grandmother's case was autopsy confirmed at her death at age 80. She had three children:

son 72 no symptoms and in good health
daughter 78 no symptoms and in good health
daughter (my mother) with LBD, symptom onset at age 76

My grandmother's onset was in her early 70's and she was, as the middle daughter put it 'vague'. My grandmother's disease presentation was so much different from my mother's. My grandmother was foggy and absent-mided for years. The movement problems and the incontinence were not there for my grandmother till the end of her life. My mother's problems started with incontinence and balance problems. My mother still has an excellent vocabulary and corrects my grammer (?!!) . Over Christmas when I was helping her cut her food she told me I was drawing attention to her infirmities. This is not something my grandmother would have said... even in the early stages of her disease.

My grandmother also lost recognition of her loved ones years before she passed away.

So I don't know what's going on here but it is possible that my mother and her mother have dementia for different reasons, or that some risk alleles can result in different disease phenotypes depending on modifier genes and environmental factors.

I wonder about a lot of environmental factors... aluminum and iron cookware, transfats which were in everything and marketed as healthier than butter, the valium my grandmother took for years which is associated with decreased glutathione levels...

My mother and her incontinence drugs which apparently are not 'brain friendly'...

It's so hard to say... likely dementia is a complex trait resulting from multiple genetic and environmental factors.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 12:05 pm
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The whole aluminum "theory" has been debunked.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 12:17 pm
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I hadn't heard that the aluminum theory has been debunked, but that's good news.

My mother had a pewter teapot that she used for decades, and pewter is an alloy of lead. I wonder about that as well.

My mother and her parents had strong preferences for fatty meats and fatty foods, cooked with bacon grease, ate lots of margarine... we now know that these habits are not healthful. Commercial bake goods can be terrible - they loved those, too... as well as the home-made ones that were made with Crisco.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 1:02 pm
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Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 1:46 pm
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Location: SF Bay Area (Northern CA)
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For confirmation about the aluminum theory being debunked, you can check out alz.org. I'm sure they address this. Their print publication on "the basics" of AD addresses this.


Tue Dec 29, 2009 4:19 pm
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Joined: Thu Aug 26, 2010 7:11 pm
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Post Re: Some blood pressure meds found protective against dement
My mom was first diagnosed with high blood pressure in her early '50's. I think it was somewhere around 2003 or 2004 that she was started on metoprolol. Guesstimate is that her dementia began in 2008. Lisinopril was added in the latter part of 2009. She was taken off of the metoprolol back in May of this year because her heart rate had been getting too slow. One time I took her to ER and it was in the 30's, yikes :shock:

I think it was in '07 or early '08 that her doctor gave her pills for incontinence. I had read an article in the NY Times suggesting that these medications brought longer term problems and considering that incontinence isn't life threatening, that these consequences weren't worth it. She stopped taking those in the spring of '09.


Mon Aug 30, 2010 7:20 pm
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Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2009 11:23 am
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Post Re: Some blood pressure meds found protective against dement
I see that its been over a year ago that I posted some comments about blood pressure meds. I mentioned that I was going to ask the GP about putting my LO on Prinivil. An ACE inhibitor that could possibly protect against dementia. I also mentioned that LO was on Doxazosin for BP and enlarged prostate but the BP rarely went below 150/90.
In May 2010, I brought the article about ACE inhibitors into LO's appointment with GP and asked if LO could be started on a small dose. The GP said he would be agreeable to trying Prinivil and started him on 5mg in addition to the Doxazosin. I am happy to report that LO's BP now runs about 120/70 but the biggest difference I notice is, He laughs and smiles a lot more. I'm not the only person noticing it. Our grown kids have also remarked about it. I am thankful for any improvement, however small.


Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:25 pm
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Joined: Thu Sep 02, 2010 8:16 am
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Post Re: Some blood pressure meds found protective against dement
Wow! Daddy was on about 4 BP meds - for years before the onset of any dementia! He did have REM sleep disturbance though.


Wed Oct 20, 2010 8:00 am
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:32 pm
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Location: Dumfries Va
Post Re: Some blood pressure meds found protective against dement
My LO was taken off Lisinopril Oct 5 because of low blood pressure (67/49). Since being taken off it, her BP average has jumped to 149/73 and has become more confused and the parkinsonism movements have become worse. Taking her back to the Dr on Friday but gave her Lisonpril today. Hope this heps. My heart is bleeding seeing her go downhill


Wed Oct 20, 2010 9:00 am
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Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:52 am
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Location: Michigan
Post Re: Some blood pressure meds found protective against dement
Interesting information.

About a year ago I asked my hubby's PCP to switch his BP medication from metoprolol to atenolol (he only takes 25 mg's) after reading about BP drugs here on the forum. This small change in meds stopped the few hallucinations and delusions he was still having.

Interesting that on our last visit to the PCP added Lisinopril 2.5mg. He said it was to protect his kidneys. We are seeing his PCP early next month - I think I'll bring him a copy of that article. He (the PCP) admits to knowing nothing about Lewy bodies but he is doing the right meds! While I'm at it, I'll bring copies to his neurologist & geriatic psychiatrist that we will be seeing in December. Wonder why they never mentioned anything about his BP meds.?!

Thank you Scientist for sharing this information.

The drug that really stopped the horrific hallucinations & delusions he was having was namenda. That was almost 2 years ago. Life has been good for us since then.

Karen


Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:22 pm
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Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2010 9:32 pm
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Location: Dumfries Va
Post Re: Some blood pressure meds found protective against dement
Thanks Karen. The visit was sucessfu. Adding the Lisinopril back stabilized her BP to an average of 125/70 and even though the hallucinations are still there they are not as bad and the movements are better. But, the memory is getting very bad. I'm going to ask about that other drug namenda during the next visit.


Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:22 am
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